Around Glen Hollow

 

Glen Hollow affords visitors a range of opportunities to relax and enjoy themselves. Whether interested in hiking, jogging, swimming, kayaking, or just taking a leisurely stroll, visitors have been coming to Seneca Point and its Glen for over a hundred years to sample its unique beauty and tranquility.  

 
The brook in high summer when the water is at its low point.

The brook in high summer when the water is at its low point.

 
One of the baby foxes that have been sighted on the property. We're not sure if this is Jamie or Michael J ...

One of the baby foxes that have been sighted on the property. We're not sure if this is Jamie or Michael J ...

 
Bopple Hill is the endpoint for most walkers, but the view coming down Bopple Hill Rd is a nice perk for those willing to tackle it.

Bopple Hill is the endpoint for most walkers, but the view coming down Bopple Hill Rd is a nice perk for those willing to tackle it.

 
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The Brook

Glen Hollow has been a tourist destination since the mid-1800's, when Seneca Point's first hotel—the Lake House—began attracting visitors. Photographs show women in Victorian dresses picnicking in the glen and men of the same era standing atop the waterfall.  This was also a favorite spot for Humphrey Bogart when he was growing up, spending his summers on Seneca Point. Today, visitors still hike the ‘gully’ back to the waterfall of Seneca Point Glen.

If hiking back to the waterfall, please be aware that the walk criss-crosses through the brook and hikers should adopt appropriate footwear. Water shoes are available in the basket near the front door in his/her sizes, but we can’t guarantee that your specific size will be present. This hike is at its best from June through September but can be enjoyed at other times, weather permitting.  Note that the broad, flat swaths of shale can be slick no matter what season you are in, so proceed carefully. We do not recommend walking the brook during the winter months though it can be approached, viewed, and photographed from along the banks then.

In April, the brook is not appropriate for hiking but its rushing waters can be fished—Rainbow Trout, and White Sucker both make their way into these waters for spawning. The tributaries and lakes in this part of the country are world-renowned for the quality of their trout fishing.

 
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The Lake

Across the road from the kitchen gate, a short walk along the gravel road to your left through the woods (not Applewood Drive) will take you to Bristol Harbour Marina on Canandaigua Lake. Gorgeous views across the lake show you Bare Hill on your left, and South Hill on your right with Vine Valley between them.

Here you can swim off the dock, and there is a full-time Life Guard on duty during the day from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Please take note of posted rules for the swimming/boating area and be courteous to others in this shared, private space.

A tandem kayak is available for guest use, located on the rack near the beach in space C-17. Kayakers must use life jackets, which are provided for your use inside the cockpit. Please leave the unused life jackets in the rack space then pack all jackets away again in the cockpit and replace the cockpit cover when you are done. 

Some tips on the tandem kayak: If you are new to kayaking or new to using a tandem, be patient and give yourself (and your partner!) time to adjust. It is sometimes best to let whomever takes the rear spot establish their rhythm before the front kayaker joins in. The most important part is to relax and have fun with it!

 
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The Hill

In the 1700’s this whole area was covered with orchards belonging to the Seneca Indians, one of the six nations of the Iroquois.  In the 1800’s the Morse family continued this practice and today you can still see terraces climbing the hill behind the house.  This is another part of Seneca Point where Bogey tramped about on adventures with his friends growing up.

An old work road cuts up the hill which you can access by heading up Seneca Point Road in the direction of Bristol Harbour. Cut in at any of the points near or past the “Fox X-ing” sign.  The path is fairly even but can be steep so be sure to go at a pace you are comfortable with.

A walk up the hill can yield any number of wildlife sightings. Our neighborhood foxes frequently forage up and down the deer paths here and can be sighted at various times of day, especially afternoons or at dusk.

Also: deer, wild turkey, and Pileated woodpeckers have been seen back here.

Please limit your exploration up here to our property which ends where the path narrows to a fairly precipitous deer track, just past the park bench which we’ve placed there.  

 
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The Road

People come from all around the area to walk the 1.5 mile stretch that runs along the lake shore from outside our house to the bottom of Bopple Hill. The three-mile circuit is nearly flat with only slight elevations along the way and has great views across the lake.  Its beauty, its flatness, and the fact that it can be completed in almost exactly an hour makes it a popular destination for walkers.

Keep an eye out for birds along the way.  Various species of woodpecker, including Pileated, like the wooded slopes overlooking the lake. Of the more colorful birds one is likely to see (depending on the season) are: Baltimore Orioles, Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks, Goldfinches, Purple Finches, Scarlet Tanagers, and Bluebirds.  Many species of waterfowl have been sighted along the shore including: Loons, Mergansers, Ruddy Ducks, Wood Ducks, and Buffleheads.

Please be cautious of drivers, who have a tendency to speed coming down the hill from Bristol Harbour.

 
The brook is at its most magical—and most treacherous—in winter.  Be wary.

The brook is at its most magical—and most treacherous—in winter.  Be wary.

 
The view of the marina from the cliff

The view of the marina from the cliff